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Why Electric Cars Are So Cheap To Drive - My Tesla Model 3 Electric Bill

Engineering Explained

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Published on Feb 27, 2019
How Does My Tesla Model 3 Affect My Electric Bill?
Why I Bought A Model 3 Performance - https://youtu.be/XzspO4-T7t4
How Does A Model 3 Handle Snow - https://youtu.be/9GAdW4Xa3MU
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How much does it cost to drive an electric car? You may be surprised to learn that electric cars are very cheap to drive, and this is a result of how efficient they are. Regardless of the fuel source, electric cars, like my Tesla Model 3, require far less energy to move from one location to another. Did you know that a Tesla Model 3 Performance's battery has the equivalent amount of energy as a 2.2 gallon tank of gasoline? It's practically on empty at a full charge, and yet thanks to the efficiency of electric motors, it can travel an EPA rated 310 miles on a full charge. So how has my electric bill changed now that I'm driving an electric car? We'll break it all down in the video!

Common Questions About Electric Car Costs:
1) What about car insurance? Not apples to oranges, but the Tesla Model 3 Mid-Range was about $30/month more to insure versus my Crosstrek. Keep in mind this is comparing a $50K car (Tesla) to a $25k car (Crosstrek). The Model 3 Performance is about $30/month more than the mid-range (significantly more expensive and more powerful vehicle). Buying performance cars is obviously not financially wise, as they tend to have great fuel/energy/maintenance/insurance/depreciation costs.
2) What about maintenance? Overall, it's less required touch points. The two big ones are changing brake fluid every two years (similar to ICE vehicles) and changing battery fluid every four years (unlike ICE vehicles, which of course have oil changes). Here's a full breakdown of the maintenance schedule: https://www.tesla.com/support/car-maintenance
3) The main point here being: the biggest cost associated with electric vehicles is the car itself. Insurance may or may not be higher depending on what vehicle you're comparing to.

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